Jinnwoo “Strangers Bring Me No Light” (GFM Records, 2016)

Jinnwojinwoo-2016o (Ben Webb) dabbles in the kind of outsider folk that at one time would have been snared by the anti-folk brigade; it’s a mix of Lou Barlow (in Sebadoh and Sentridoh low-fi obscured by the process mode) the naivety of Daniel Johnson, some Viking Moses, R Stevie Moore and heap of Danielson’s off-kilter playfulness. He’s gathered a host of collaborators to provide or add vocals, or produce, his own voice is a pronounced witter and when it is stirred into an obfuscated fog of clanging instruments – it can be rather hard going. Continue reading “Jinnwoo “Strangers Bring Me No Light” (GFM Records, 2016)”

Jason Isbell Collaborates with Amanda Shires

And you can have a listen. Rolling Stone Country reports: “One year after popping up in the end credits of British documentary The Fear of 13, Jason Isbell and Amanda Shires’ “The Color of a Cloudy Day” is receiving a proper release. The song joins Amazon’s ever-growing “Amazon Acoustics” playlist this morning, appearing alongside stripped-down recordings by John Hiatt, Ashley Monroe and Rodney Crowell. “The Color of a Cloudy Day” drapes Isbell and Shires’ harmonies over acoustic guitars, swelling violins and an understated drum loop. It’s light and lovely, swimming in reverb and moving forward at a moody, measured pace. Collaboratively written in the couple’s living room and kitchen on the outskirts of Nashville, the song also sets the stage for Shires’ upcoming solo album, My Piece of Land, whose songs feature a handful of rare Isbell co-writes. Continue reading “Jason Isbell Collaborates with Amanda Shires”

Johnny Dowd “Execute American Folklore” (Mother Jinx Records, 2016)

Johnny-Dowds-2016By now you either get or don’t get Johnny Dowd. Ten albums in this Ithaca NY resident continues to move further into the outfield with each release. Execute American Folklore features Dowd’s darkly humorous and idiosyncratic lyrics, his pronounced drawl becoming ever more robotic, over a hyperkinetic drum machine with guitar, keyboards and bass fed through pedals and gizmos, fuzzed and funky and above all freaky. Originally lumped in with the Gothic Americana crowd Dowd now seems to have more in common with Snakefinger, sometime associate of The Residents, psychedelic funk and on several songs here, that brand of Tropicalia as practised by Os Mutantes while the grim humour approaches  Lenny Bruce satire. Continue reading “Johnny Dowd “Execute American Folklore” (Mother Jinx Records, 2016)”