Dan Michaelson “Careless” – Listen

There’s nothing careless about this track – the string section is magnificent, Dan Michaelson’s cracked vocal is simply embodying the distress of unravelling love.  Someone should check Dan’s ok.  But before you do that take a listen to the second single from his upcoming album First Light, which will be out early December.

The Travelling Band “Mopping Forwards” – Listen

New single Mopping Forwards sees the Travelling Band’s trademark “Mancunian Americana” take the inspiration for lyrics sparked after long night at a bar in Manchester’s Northern Quarter where lead singer and songwriter Jo Dudderidge used to play a regular Country DJ set: “There was a new guy working his first shift and at the end of the night, he got the mop and bucket out ready to clean the floor. But he started pushing the mop forwards instead of backwards: he was walking the dirt off his shoes right into the floor he’d just cleaned… and he carried on regardless; I’m not sure he even noticed what he was doing. I thought it made a wry metaphor for life, and the lyrics to Mopping Forwards stemmed from there.” If you’ve ever tried mopping forwards, it’s actually quite difficult to do.

Harry Pane “Here We Stay” – Listen

Harry Pane’s new song Here We Stay is a story of lovers, set amongst a tragedy, with some rather nice lyrics and Harry’s signature intricate fingerpicking on the guitar creating a touching soulful sounding folk track.  It comes after the release of his latest EP “The Wild Winds” earlier this year which saw him crowned as BBC Introducing’s Featured artist and picked to collaborate with Frank Turner at The Roundhouse for Frank’s Lost Evening’s with OneFest, which as cruel and unusual punishments go is particularly harsh. What must he have done in a past life?

H.C. McEntire “A Lamb, A Dove” – Listen

H.C. McEntire, frontwoman of Mount Moriah, is striking out on her own with her debut solo album Lionheart which sees the light of day in January, and she’s shared the album opener “A Lamb, A Dove,” along with a lyric video. She’s collaborated on the record with many of her favourite musicians, including Kathleen Hanna, Angel Olsen, Amy Ray, Tift Merritt, William Tyler, Mary Lattimore, and Phil Cook. She says of the album: “In music, there are no rules. You make your own language. You can be both the Southern rock outlier and the twangy gospel conduit. You can be both the cherubic, honey-tongued innocent and the ardent punk. To get here—to find my lion heart—I had to become them all.” Like a shape shifter.

Track premiere: Orphan Colours “High Hopes” – Listen

Orphan Colours release their new single this Friday, and we have an exclusive stream for you here at AUK. When UK alt country outfit ahab went on indefinite hiatus, songwriter Steven Llewellyn decided to form his own band with the help of ahab originator Dave Burn and former bassist Graham Knight and hey presto Orphan Colours was born. Llewellyn told us:”High Hopes  was written very quickly, within half an hour. It was one of those strange occasions where it just flowed out without having to think too much about it. It sounded great as soon as we played it together as a band and it’s been part of our live set ever since.” The song is the first track to be lifted from debut album ‘All On Red’ which is out 26th January 2018, and the band have also been selected to showcase at the Americana Music Association Festival in the new year.  Now they just have to make a video for the song that’s worthy of its title.

Willie Breeding ft. Caitlin Rose “Prague Spring” – Listen

Kentucky based newcomer Willie Breeding will release his debut album ‘Big Sky’ early next year, with the first single to be taken from it Prague Spring featuring a guest vocal from Caitlin Rose.  Detailing the story behind the song he explains “One night in Prague, 1962, the son of the Italian ambassador met an actress they called, “The Czech Bridgette Bardot”.  Their adventures were like a black and white noir. Bullets were drunk out of martini glasses. Official diplomatic vehicles were stolen.  14 years later, my wife was born… I called Caitlin because she’s one of my favorite lyricists, and I thought she would enjoy the story. I felt too close to the material working on it myself. Later, when I was showing my wife the lyrics Caitlin and I had written, she instantly came up with the last line of the song, which I took as a good omen.”