Dirty Dozen: Torgeir Waldemar

 

Torgeir Waldemar took the Norwegian people and music press by surprise with his eponymous debut album in 2014. Who had thought that the black-clad, longhaired and bearded man would deliver an album that captivated and moved us as much as it did? An acoustic masterpiece that sounded like it came straight from the rehearsal room of a young troubadour from Laurel Canyon in the seventies.

Can you tell us about yourself? Where you’re from and what you’ve been up to over the past few years?
I am born in Tønsberg, one of the oldest towns in Northern Europe. I lived out on the countryside until I was 20 years old, then I moved to Oslo, and I have been there ever since. Over the past few years I have combined my regular job in a drug rehabiliatation centre, with working on my musical career. I have toured Norway several times, played a lot of festivals, toured Germany with Wovenhand, and played support for several of the biggest acts in Norway, such as Sivert Hoyem and

How would you describe your music?
It’s desperate. It’s melodic. It’s poetic. It’s even funny sometimes. It’s serious. It’s pathetic. It’s pretty good.

Can you tell us a little bit about your influences?
They all play guitar. Or bass maybe.

What are you currently promoting?
I am currently promoting my new album No Offending Borders, that will be out on January the 27nd.

Have you got a particular song you’ve done that you’re particularly proud of, one that might define you?
I will say that the song The Bottom Of The Well is a song that I am really proud of because it’s simple and short, and it tells a story that is really dramatic. And hopefully it will speak to some people that are in a really struggling part of their lives.

What are you currently listening to?
Since I have been working on the album, I am not really listening to anything in particular because it is 100% consuming.

And your favourite album of all time, the one you couldn’t do without?
Townes Van Zandt: Our Mother The Mountain

What are your hopes for your future career?
The ultimate goal would be to able to tour the world with a full band and present the music in the most impactful live version possible.

If money were no object what would be your dream project?

Then I would start a project for drug addicts/homeless people that will help them to use their resources in ways that they have dreamt of but never could do. I strongly believe that most people are capable to do great stuff with their lives if they just have to have the opportunity to do it.

What’s the best thing about being a musician?
Being able to speak a language that is beyond words.

And the worst?
Being forced to describe what I am doing, and having it compared to others.

Finally, have you anything you’d like to say to the readers of Americana UK?
Be cool. Don’t be a dick. We all need each other if our world is going to be a better place for all of us.

Author: Rudie Hayes

Rudie is the weekly host of the syndicated radio show - The Horseshoe Lounge Music Session - playing the best American Roots and hosting terrific live guests.

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