Three tunes for a Monday! Josh Ritter, Jamestown Revival and Calexico with Iron & Wine

Rolling Stone Country have published a flurry (the non-snow variety) of good tunage over the last few days which you won’t want to miss, so we’re posting them here.  First up is Calexico and Iron & Wine who are reuniting for their new collaborative album ‘Years to Burn’ due out June 14th a full fourteen years after they teamed up to release the 2005 EP ‘In the Reins.’ According to Sam Beam: “Life is hard. Awesome. And scary as shit. But it can lift you up if you let it. These are the things Joey and I write about now. And the title can encapsulate a lot of things. Years to Burn could mean you’re cocky, you’ve got it made. Or, our life is ours to burn, to be inspired. Or you’re burned by life, brutalized. It’s an ambiguous title, because life is complicated.”

Next is a new song from Austin band Jamestown Revival taken from their third album ‘San Isabel’ which comes out over the summer. Co-produced by the band’s Jonathan Clay and Zach Chance, with former Nathaniel Rateliff collaborator Jamie Mefford, Clay describes the song as “very much a Simon and Garfunkel inspired tune.” Which is never a bad thing.

And last but certainly not least is the new song from Josh Ritter who it’d be difficult for us to love more were he the second coming (which we don’t know for sure he’s not yet). ‘I Still Love You (Now and Then)’ is taken from his forthcoming album ‘Fever Breaks’ which is produced by Jason Isbell. In the song, according to RS: “Ritter addresses a former love who still holds in her sway a piece of his shattered heart. Even as he references a new romance in the mournful ballad’s lyrics, he is simultaneously drawn to a powerful memory, singing, “I still love you now and then, when her fingers brush my skin/When the night falls over all of everything that’s been/And everything we were and cannot be again.”

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Author: Mark Whitfield

Mark Whitfield has been the Editor of Americana UK for the last 17 years and still feels like this is his pretend job, mainly because it is.

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