The Waterboys announce UK dates for autumn 2017

Mike Scott’s Scottish folk legends (and we don’t use that word lightly) The Waterboys have signed to BMG Records and will release a brand-new studio album later in the year. Further details will be announced soon, but in the meantime the band have announced a series of dates for October across the UK (plus one date in Ireland).  Presale tickets are available from today (head to their website for more information), while they go on general sale tomorrow.  And if you cannae wait then you can catch them on various tour dates over the summer including Beautiful Days (although you would have to endure Frank Turner in doing so).  Here are the dates, along with their entire performance from Glasto 2015.  Continue reading “The Waterboys announce UK dates for autumn 2017”

Hiss Golden Messenger to release series of live recordings

We’re big fans of HGM here at AUK so this is a nice little treat to see the month out. Paste report: “Taking a cue from the Grateful Dead’s legendary Dick’s Picks series, Hiss Golden Messenger are launching their own collection of live recordings. Affectionately dubbed “Parker’s Picks” after Warren Parker who joined the band on their fall tour of the U.S. to record the shows, the series kicked off today with the release of the band’s performance at The Parish in Austin on Oct. 18.  Continue reading “Hiss Golden Messenger to release series of live recordings”

Dirty Dozen: Nick Ellis

Nick Ellis is a Liverpool based singer/songwriter and guitarist performing a style of streetscape narrative-noir blended with a modern British acoustic approach. No nonsense, song and melody are the order of the day. Some people call it ‘folk’, some just call it good old fashioned song craft. Using a blend of rhythmic attack and finger-quick lucidity, his sound has been described as ‘a conversation between Elvis Costello and John Martyn’. Continue reading “Dirty Dozen: Nick Ellis”

Chip Taylor “A Song I Can Live With” (Train Wreck Records, 2017)

“Good Morning from New York. It is January 11th 2016. David Bowie died yesterday.” Chip Taylor’s voice and delivery conjures up a feeling of warmth and intimacy that reminds one greatly of the late Alistair Cooke and his weekly ‘Letter from America’ for Radio 4. Taylor shares a similar avuncular style to the radio presenter. In a bizarre crime, before cremation, Cooke’s body was stolen and his bones sold as parts for bone grafts by a crooked surgeon, who never told the recipients that Cooke had died from cancer that had metastasized throughout his body, including said bones. Continue reading “Chip Taylor “A Song I Can Live With” (Train Wreck Records, 2017)”

Gin Blossoms reflect on their classic album 25 years on

If you’ve never heard “New Miserable Experience” and you want a new not all that miserable experience, it really is worth digging out. Nice little piece (well, not so little) in Rolling Stone this morning about the Gin Blossoms classic: “It’s a miracle that the Gin Blossoms’ breakthrough album, New Miserable Experience, exists at all. When the band left Tempe, Arizona, in 1992, headed for Memphis’ famed Ardent Studios to record their first album for A&M Records, the mood was far from optimistic. A first attempt at cutting the record in 1991 in Los Angeles was a $100,000 disaster. The group teetered on the edge of being dropped, and, most alarmingly, their founder and chief songwriter, guitarist Doug Hopkins, was in the throes of mental illness and alcoholism.  Continue reading “Gin Blossoms reflect on their classic album 25 years on”

Those Lavender Whales “My Bones are Singing” (Fork & Spoon Records, 2017)

There is a backstory to My Bones Are Singing, and although it’s not explicitly spelt out at any point on the album it’s so relevant that it can’t really be ignored. Before recording My Bones are Singing, Aaron Graves, who is Those Lavender Whales, had been diagnosed with a life threatening brain tumour. Knowing this puts an extra emphasis on the reflections on mortality that permeate the album – it’s not something that can just be dismissed as existential angst or a grappling with the awful inevitability of life’s ultimate destination. Continue reading “Those Lavender Whales “My Bones are Singing” (Fork & Spoon Records, 2017)”

The Andrew Collins Trio “And It Was Good” (Independent, 2017)

This is a difficult album to review simply because I’ve never heard anything quite like it before. For a start, it’s totally instrumental; unusual in the Americana genre, though the music does have its roots quite firmly in Bluegrass.  It’s also a concept album, something else that’s quite rare in this genre. And not just any old concept – this album takes the rather grand biblical story of creation as its theme. You certainly can’t accuse Andrew Collins and his band mates, Mike Mezzatesta and James McEleney of lacking ambition. Continue reading “The Andrew Collins Trio “And It Was Good” (Independent, 2017)”