Rachel Baiman “Shame” (Free Dirt, 2017)

It’s been a while since Shirley and her illustrious Company castigated us (rather unjustly) for our collective inability, or flat refusal, to dance, declaring this to be a damn Shame, Shame, Shame. Anyone missing such admonishment should check out Rachel Baiman’s excellent new album. Shame may be on the agenda again, but this time the target of ire isn’t discotheque wallflowers, but the purveyors of organised religion: to be more precise, the tenets of the Church, which Baiman believes inculcate negative feelings of shame from birth onwards with concepts like Original Sin.  Continue reading “Rachel Baiman “Shame” (Free Dirt, 2017)”

Interview: Southern Companion

Southern Companion are that shaded area, the bit in the middle, of the Venn diagram that is country music and Americana, the switch point between the two genres.  He/they are multiple winners at the latest BCMAs and their album, ‘1000 Days of Rain’ is one of the best UK country records of the last 10 years.  We caught their hirsute main man, Darren after ripping up the crowd at Maverick Festival. Continue reading “Interview: Southern Companion”

Cash family “sickened” by neo-nazi in Johnny Cash t-shirt

it’s not been one of the most cheerful weeks of news has it? The solidarity in this should warm your soul for a Friday morning anyway. RS Country reports: “Rosanne Cash and the Cash family said they were “sickened” by a video that showed a “self-proclaimed neo-Nazi” in Charlottesville wearing a Johnny Cash T-shirt. Rosanne Cash posted the fervent note on her Facebook Wednesday on behalf of herself and her siblings Kathy, Cindy, Tara and John Carter. Continue reading “Cash family “sickened” by neo-nazi in Johnny Cash t-shirt”

Paul Messinger “America 2.0 – Assorted Tales and The New Myth” (Independent 2017)

America 2.0 is an extraordinary album that attempts to examine the very concept of what America is in the Trump era and what it means to be part of the great American melting pot. It is massive in its ambition and scope and it very nearly pulls it off. Messinger is patently a very savvy and politicised observer who use his lyrics and devastating harmonica skills to lead his band through a range of styles and tropes encompassing gospel, dustbowl blues, reggae and straight ahead rock n roll.

Continue reading “Paul Messinger “America 2.0 – Assorted Tales and The New Myth” (Independent 2017)”

Pitchfork Live series hosts Iron & Wine tonight

Get your cocktails/mocktails ready.  They report: “Pitchfork is pleased to announce the latest installment in the ongoing Pitchfork Live series. On Friday, August 18, Iron & Wine will perform live from the studios at One World Trade Center in New York City. The broadcast begins at 4 p.m. Eastern, and will be available to stream on Facebook, YouTube, the Scene, and our homepage. Iron & Wine is readying the release of his next album Beast Epic, which is out August 25 via Sub Pop. He recently shared the video for the LP’s “Thomas County Law.” Check it out below.” Continue reading “Pitchfork Live series hosts Iron & Wine tonight”

Steve Earle: “We’ve never had an orangutan in the White House before”

There’s a fascinating interview with Steve Earle over at RS Country this morning where he talks extensively about, among other things, his latest record and Trump.  He tells them: “I don’t see him finishing the term. I don’t see how he does it. Although it’s hard to predict what this guy’s gonna do. We’ve never had an orangutan in the White House before. There’s a lot of “What does this button do?” going on. It’s scary. He really is a fascist. Whether he intended to be or not, he’s a real live fascist. Continue reading “Steve Earle: “We’ve never had an orangutan in the White House before””

Track premiere: Moonsville Collective “Hurricane Girl” – Listen

Moonsville Collective is a Southern California five piece whose new album “Moonsville III” comes out on September 8th promising “sonically warmer, more upbeat waters” for these troubled times. Their new single from the record, Hurricane Girl is an understated, bluegrass train shuffle and love song with a brush-snare backbeat and mandolin solo that channels Whiskeytown-era Ryan Adams, Josh Ritter’s delicate indie/folk sound, and the band’s communal, nostalgiac approach to “music for music’s sake.”  Simon Cowell would not be pleased.