Eliza Edens “Westlawn Cemetery” – one day all this will be mine

Eliza Edens has a new album, her second, out soon (October 14th to be exact) – it’s called ‘We’ll Become the Flowers‘, which is a line from today’s song.  Gentle finger-picking accompanies a musing on existence – and on the end of existence – which finds some acceptance in the thought that we all head the same way in the end and our ultimate destination will see us alongside old friends and familiar family.  Which may, or may not, be a comfort.

Eliza Edens has described how the song came about during the Covid lockdowns: “During the depths of the pandemic, I was hunkering down at my childhood home with my parents in the Berkshires of Western Massachusetts. I went for walks everyday, usually just up the street to a small bucolic cemetery where I formed many early childhood memories – sledding, walking the dog, learning to drive. During this time while I was home, it started to become clear that my mother really needed extra help and care due to her illness. One afternoon on one of my walks, I started thinking a lot about mortality, the irony of gravestones, and how much time she spent as a professional gardener – tending to the earth and making the world a more beautiful place in the most literal way. Those thoughts swirled together and this song manifested after fussing around in a tuning I learned from a Nick Drake song. My collaborator Pat had the idea of putting electronic drums on the song which adds a felt heartbeat and weight to the song. It’s all about the difficulty of accepting change and death.


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About Jonathan Aird 2043 Articles
Sure, I could climb high in a tree, or go to Skye on my holiday. I could be happy. All I really want is the excitement of first hearing The Byrds, the amazement of decades of Dylan's music, or the thrill of seeing a band like The Long Ryders live. That's not much to ask, is it?

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