First Aid Kit “It’s a Shame” – Listen

Swedish folkericana duo First Aid Kit have released a new single taken from their forthcoming as yes untitled album which they talked to Paste about: “We went to Los Angeles last spring and spent five weeks there writing. It was a tough time for the both of us. We were in this beautiful, sunny place but mostly felt sad and lonely. ‘It’s a Shame’ is a song about the emptiness and desperation you feel after a relationship has come to an end, how you will go to great lengths just to numb the pain and feel less lonely.”

Louis Brennan “Bit Part Actor” – Listen

If there’s a prize going for the deepest, growliest, vocal, then Louis Brennan is in the running for it. His vocal is responsible for giving a well full of gravitas to the London-based Dubliner’s new single Bit Part Actor. It’s a modern folk song that revels in a familiar world weariness “I watched the narrative fade right off the page / I watched my friends grow up and grow apart, grow cynical with age” which then crystallises into an anguishing personal insight “on Sunday morning 27th July / I woke up from a nightmare and I wanted so to die / I saw every opportunity that ever passed me by / There in your cold blue eyes”.

Brother Roy “Carolina” – Listen

Carolina is a track from the debut album, Last Man Standing, from growly voiced folk-rocker Brother Roy. It’s a superb funky groove with touches of Levon Helm and Dr John in the vocal whilst the keyboards take their lead from Al Kooper’s mid-sixties work with Dylan. It’s a truly classic sound from an artist who unashamedly confesses to influences like Harry Nilsson, The Beatles, The Band, Bob Dylan, and Neil Young – a familiar name-check list for sure but rather refreshingly Brother Roy writes and sings songs that sound like he actually has been influenced by ’em. Rolling and rollicking it’s a good time encapsulated.

Track premiere: Chris J Connolly “Fight at the End”

“Fight At The End” is the first single from Chris J Connolly’s  sophomore album “Moving Maps” which comes out next month. The track draws from elements of americana, folk, and pop, interlacing guitar textures, harmonies and melody into a reflection on an earlier time in his life. In Connolly’s words: “Fight At The End is about perseverance. It’s about fighting, even if everything seems to tell you that you will lose. I guess it’s about human instinct and survival as much as it is about love. But then, maybe they are one and the same thing.” I’m a Celebrity… notwithstanding of course.

The Barr Brothers “Queens of the Breakers” – Listen

The Barr Brothers have shared the title track from their forthcoming album which is worryingly described as “anthemic” but is actually a lovely very melodic piece of music. The album, the band’s first in three years, will be released on October 13th, and they have just announced too that they’ll be supporting The War On Drugs for a mostly sold out 17 date run of UK and European dates in November.  ‘Queens of the Breakers’ takes its name from The Breakers, a Vanderbilt mansion perched atop Newport, Rhode Island’s rocky coastline, where as teenagers, brothers Brad and Andrew Barr were part of a mischievous group of friends that would descend upon Newport dressed in their mothers’ clothing. Kind of WH Davies meets Danny La Rue.

Track premiere: Valparaiso “Bury My Body”

Valparaiso release their debut album ‘Broken Homeland’ tomorrow and they’ve shared the track Bury My Body from the record with us which features some striking vocals from Shannon Wright. The Parisian musical collective deriving from the cult band Jack The Ripper also features the voices and poetry of Phoebe Killdeer of Nouvelle Vague, Howe Gelb, Spain’s Josh Haden, Dominique A, Moriarty’s Rosemary Standley, Venus’ Marc Huyghens, Mansfield Tya’s Julia Lanoë, and is recorded, mixed and produced by John Parish. Look out for a tour soon with different guests each night (we’d lay money down one of them won’t be Ronan Keating).

Gill Landry “Denver Girls” – Listen

Gill Landry has unveiled his new single Denver Girls which is taken from his upcoming album “Love Rides A Dark Horse” – he told Billboard: “It’s about a person as much as a conversation with life and is sort of about leaving the old Gods and anchors behind and realising where you are at the moment. That’s the last song I wrote for the record. I wrote all these songs, and at the end I was like, ‘Well, that’s not where I’m at or where I want to be.’ I felt I needed to communicate those things, too, and I’m very glad I did. ‘Denver Girls’ is moving out of where I was and into where I am now.” Landry tours the UK in November supporting Ian Felice. Dates below.

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The Deportees – “A Single Truth” – Listen

The Deportees are an Aberdeen based band who look to the likes of Teenage Fanclub, The Waterboys, and Wilco as their musical inspirations.  Over three years in the making, their debut album The Birth of Industry is out on November 3rd (launch party, by the by, is at Dunbar Street Hall the next day)  and the first single is A Single Truth which displays those influences nicely.  Is there a touch of King Creosote in there as well?  Could be – take a listen.

Jon Boden “All the Stars are Coming Out Tonight” – Listen

12-time BBC Folk Award winner (greedy) and ex-Bellowhead frontman, Jon Boden has just shared his new single All The Stars Are Coming Out Tonight in advance of his new solo album ‘Afterglow’ which arrives on October 6th via Hudson Records. Speaking about the new track, Boden says: “Without easy access to electric light and with a shortage of oil, our lives will again become bounded by the astronomical cycle of the universe, and our relationship with the stars will become closer, uninhibited by artificial light pollution. I wanted the stars to have a big presence in the album, particularly Orion who, as a ‘hunter’, is someone who our hero identifies with as he searches the city for a girl he knew once but hasn’t seen for many years.” And his car keys.

The Mining Co. “Mountain Fires” – Listen

The new album from London based indie-folksters The Mining Co. looks back to a different time: “a time of total freedom, a wild childhood, long days and nights spent listening to radio stations like Radio Luxembourg, before the internet and before mobile phone communication and the start of a love for music: Elvis, Springsteen, New Wave: the soundtrack to love – come, gone and missed – a celebration to the past that still shines brightly.”  That’s what the PR says although from personal experience, childhoods in the 80s were Jimmy Young, music drowned in over production and being tucked up in bed by about 5.30pm with cauliflower cheese (again).  This track from it is still lovely.